Category: Fieldwork

diSEASe

by on March 29, 2021 6:55 pm
Disease is an inevitable process, foundational to the cycling and continuation of life. As humans we have worked tirelessly to stave off disease in the many clothes it wears. For other organisms, disease is a garment that is not so easily shed. There is no treatment, there is no second chance for most organisms with… Read more diSEASe

The lega-sea of John Pearse

by on November 16, 2020 12:36 pm
Dr. John Pearse (1936—2020) led foundational research on kelp forests and the intertidal, wrote textbooks exploring the world of invertebrates, and created LiMPETS, an education and citizen science program used across the coast of California to monitor its intertidal communities. His research illuminated distant corners of the ocean spanning from Monterey Bay to Antarctica to… Read more The lega-sea of John Pearse

Sharky Reefs

by on June 25, 2020 10:24 am
Coral reefs are amazingly diverse habitats, harbouring thousands of different species of fishes,  large charismatic sharks, and benthic organisms (i.e. ocean bottom-dwelling—including all the immobile organisms growing to make up the reef like corals, algae, sponges, etc.). These different species interact with each other, in particular through feeding interactions, which can determine which species, and… Read more Sharky Reefs

Isolated continent to social isolation: a tale of research in Antarctica and an escape from the safest place on earth

by on May 1, 2020 3:21 pm
Traveling to Antarctica for my PhD work is an enormous privilege. The Antarctic is one of the harshest and most remote places on earth. Lots of advance preparation is needed, but the unique biological systems and special people who work there make it all worth it. I traveled to the Antarctic this year with Dave… Read more Isolated continent to social isolation: a tale of research in Antarctica and an escape from the safest place on earth

What's a Strong Coral Anyway?

by on April 1, 2020 3:51 pm
[I would be remiss if I didn’t mention coronavirus. I’m sitting in my newly converted home office, which is actually a small and surprisingly functional corner of my bedroom. I haven’t been to my lab in over two weeks now and counting. I also canceled a trip to check on my field experiment in Palau… Read more What's a Strong Coral Anyway?

Deep Frying in a Tank Top

by on January 25, 2019 1:33 pm
This is the final of a three-post series written by undergraduate students who completed summer research in Palau with the Palumbi lab. This past summer, a research team consisting of members of Steve Palumbi’s lab at Hopkins Marine Station and Stanford undergraduates set out to study resilience of Palau’s corals to rising ocean temperatures. When… Read more Deep Frying in a Tank Top

Flame of the Sea

by on January 23, 2019 9:23 pm
This is the second of a three-post series written by undergraduate students who completed summer research in Palau with the Palumbi lab. The indigo of the open ocean reflects the bright baby blue sky, forming an azure world only broken by the green palm trees of distant islands. I inhale air, saturated with salt, as… Read more Flame of the Sea

A Day in the Life of My Summer in Palau

by on January 21, 2019 10:00 am
This is the first of a three-post series written by undergraduate students who completed summer research in Palau with the Palumbi lab. It’s 6 AM in Palau, a country east of the Philippines, and we’re 16 hours ahead of the rest of the Palumbi lab in California. I have been living here for a few… Read more A Day in the Life of My Summer in Palau

Paradise Irradiated

by on November 1, 2018 9:25 pm
Diving in a nuclear bomb crater is surreal. A truly catastrophic event took place here, and yet here you are, swimming among corals, reef fish, and sharks. Everyone is just going about their business- swimming, eating, searching for a mate- as if there’s nothing unusual about their surroundings. It’s hard not to wonder how recovery… Read more Paradise Irradiated

Undergraduates survey the intertidal zone

by on June 8, 2018 8:17 pm
In the spring at Hopkins Marine Station, the best low tides often occur in the early morning. For undergraduate students wanting to learn more about the plants and animals along the Monterey coast, this means waking up early, putting on warm field clothes, and walking out among the mussels, anemones, and algae. Everything is golden… Read more Undergraduates survey the intertidal zone